Wednesday, October 10, 2012

451 41-68 Period 5

257 comments:

  1. How does the author's writing style affect the feel of the book?

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    1. I think that the author's style really conveys the thoughts of the main character- the sentences get short and choppy when Montag is frustrated, and when he is deep in thought, the style of writing changes ever so slightly to convey his thoughtfulness.

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    2. He used lots of big vocablary and has lack of connection between thoughts. This makes the book a higher level read.

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    3. For the last few pages of this section, I felt that it was a part of the story where Bradley sets up the foundation of the story through Beatty's dialogue.

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  2. Why do you think Mildred is not curious about the books?

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    1. Mildred is simple minded and, like the rest of society, doesn't question their life style.

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    2. I think she was too hurt to even comment to Guy. This was shown when Guy pours down the 20 books and her reaction was to burn the books and was screaming. I think she couldn't admit it to herself that her husband was holding books in her house.

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    3. I think that Mildred isn't curious about the books, because all of her life she has been told not to read them, it was always illegal. So I think that she still feels like it's not right to do be curious.

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    4. I think she was very curious about them, just not in the way Montag was. She wondered why her husband had books, but she wanted to burn them. She was the stereotype of the society and she is so brainless that she doesn't care about what's in the books.

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    5. Mildred acts as a typical representation of all the civilians, where they accept their ignorance and lifestyle because that it all they have ever known. So, she does not care about the books because she has lived life that way so far.

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    6. She has been heavily dosed with the fictional world/history that the government has created, so like Olivia, I think that she just doesn't question the way she "lives" her life.

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    7. she is not curious, she is more concerned and worried, not because Montag has a book, but because she knows what will happen if Beatty find the books.

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    8. She's obsessed with the TV. She lacks interest because she is distracted and enthralled.

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    9. Mildred is brainwashed by society and all she thinks about is watching TV and taking her pills. Everything else does not matter. This was normal for civilians to do this. She represents what a "normal" person is in this time period.

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    10. I don't think she really cares. I feel like she just wants her life to go smoothly and that is a problem that she doesn't want to face.

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  3. Why has Montag been keeping all those books?

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    1. I think Montag is curious as to what the world is like if you read books.

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    2. Maybe he subconsciously took all the books, like they one he took from the house the other night.

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    3. I think that Montag has been keeping all of the books because he is curious about what lies beyond the covers, and what made people write them.

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    4. He is different from other firemen. He wants to know what is in the books. Though, he hasn't read them yet because he is warring inside of him and he can't be sure what to do. But he was pushed over the edge when he watched the old woman die, and now he feels he has nothing to lose.

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    5. Why hasn't Montag read the books? Why would he just keep them?

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    6. I think that he's secretly curious about books and why people would risk losing everything to read and keep those books, so almost unconsciously, he's been stealing and hiding those books, but he's afraid to try to read them until Beatty comes and talks to him.

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    7. Beatty referred to the normal thirst each fireman has to read what is in the books they burn. This seems like the motive to why he has been storing the books.

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    8. He's curious, which in his society is is frowned upon. People are supposed to be docile and addicted to TV.

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  4. Montag was curious and he didn't feel right about burning the books, so he may have wanted to keep some to see what they were about for himself

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  5. According to Captain Beatty, every fireman has had this stage of stealing books, feeling guilty for burning people and books. Why do you think if every fireman has had this stage in their career why hasn't society changed?

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    1. Because eventually they just get over it and turn to what they think is "right". The guilt makes them brainless- and eventually they turn into Mildreds.

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    2. Beatty and other cheif firemen always convince the firemen that books are bad. Montag is one of the few who actually rebels and doesn't follow what he is told.

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    3. Besides, if they do decide to rebel, they are soon taken down by other firemen or the Mechanical Hound.

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    4. If you are around something long enough, especially if it is banned, then your curiosity will get the best of you. I think that is a part of human nature to want to explore the unknown. All through history humans have been challenging the rules that have been set in place by those in power.

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    5. I think that every fireman goes through this stage because they all experience the same thing. However, there has probably always been someone like Beatty to talk them through it. Also, because this society has been living this way for so long and doesn't see knowledge or meaning in books, they feel that there is nothing wrong with they way they live.

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    6. I think every fireman has this stage because they each have a shocking or disturbing instance that takes place that is connected with books. With Guy it was when the old lady committed suicide by burning herself with her books.

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    7. Beatty says that at this time "all they need is understanding". I think that when the firemen go through this stage, they feel more lost and confused than motivated to change something.
      Also, they probably think they are alone in these thoughts, since the rest of society appears to be the same and not care, even though there may be another individual thinking the same thing. People with thoughts of change are afraid to try anything, they don't believe an individual can stand up and inspire change even though something may be really wrong.

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  6. Why hasn't Montag read the books that he's been keeping? Also, how come Bradley didn't tell us about the books before?

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    1. I think Montag just felt too guilty to read the books he had stolen. And Bradley didn't tell us about the books because Montag- until now- refused to think about them, and since this book is written in third person limited, the narrator is limited to the thoughts of one man.

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    2. That was earlier in the story. However, it seems very much so that Montag was guilty, or scared because he collected so many without reading any of them.

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    3. Montag wasn't sure if books were good or bad before. He was unsure of whether they were important. Though, when he watched the old lady die with her books, he realized what he was doing and how books might hold the answer to his questions. We didn't hear about the books before because we are following Montag through the story, and he was half-ignoring the books he had kept, so the books were only revealed to us when they were revealed to him (like how important they might be).

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  7. Why is it important that the point of the firemen is to keep people happy, and to preserve their peace of mind (according to Beatty)?

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    1. Beatty thought that it was the Fireman's job to destroy the history, the imaginations, of the past.

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    2. According to Beatty, people can get insulted by the books, and they could protest, so firemen keep people happy and preserve their peace of mind by burning all those books so that there's no chance for someone to read it, be insulted, and riot, which then makes others upset.

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    3. If the firemen and other figures did not help to keep the public in line and content with their ignorance, then society would have experienced change a while ago. The firemen's jobs are actually very important in keeping the public tamed, as they remove all of the novels. Novels could inspire change or motivate different thinking and questioning, and that is not what the government want, as they want to keep their power.

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  8. Do you think that the other firemen have also been reading books? Beatty said that all firemen get the curiosity to see what's inside.

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    1. I think other fireman have tried with the books, as there is the 24 hour rule. That wouldn't be in place unless others have tried to read books before. However, there are fireman that are probably too afraid of the government to read a book. What do you think?

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  9. Why does Beatty tell Montag the truth when Montag is home sick?

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    1. I think that it is because Beatty knows that Montag isn't sick, as in stomach flu, but in mentally sick, and confused.

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    2. To add to what Rebecca said, Beatty mentioned that he had also gone through this himself, so he knew what to tell Montag and how to "help" him

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    3. I think Beatty tells Montag the truth because he knows that unless Montag trusts him he will never come back to the force. Also Beatty knows that Montag thinks that there is something bigger going on. To keep the peace and stop a potential disturbance he told him. Also it stated later in the book that every fireman hits a wall and becomes curious about books. This is probably a routine conversation that he has with other firemen.

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    4. Beatty knows that Montag is going through the stage that "all firemen go through", where they are curious and questioning. On page 51, Beatty says that firemen in this phase "need to know the history of our profession", so he tells Montag about it. On page 50, Beatty says "he's seen it all". He is wise, and he could have lied to Montag, but I think he knows that Montag wouldn't buy it.

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  10. The author barely makes Clarisse's death essential. Why do you think that is? How will her death be portrayed later in the book?

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    1. Montag will make a bigger deal about it down the road, but when Beatty is talking about her, Montag has to go along with what he is saying, but Montag probably doesn't agree with him about Clarisse.

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    2. I don't actually think that she is dead, I feel like that people are lying to Montag. If Clarisse is actually dead I think that the author made her death very low key, so that later in the book her death can become a huge deal.

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    3. I think Clarisse's death will have a heavy affect on Guy. She was really the only person it seemed that he liked talking to. He enjoyed her company. Now that she's gone Guy has to go back to his normal life and it seems like he doesn't want that

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    4. I think that her death is just too horrible for Montag to bear- so he doesn't think about this. We don't even know if she's actually dead. I would be kind of disappointed if this was her last time really "being" in the books. But the book is written in third person limited- so the narrator is limited to the thoughts of one man. So if Montag doesn't think it, we don't know it.

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    5. Clarisse's disappearance will probably make a bigger effect later on. Right now, it seems like Montag's thoughts are more focused on the mechanical hound, but it'll probably shift back to thinking about Clarisse soon, since that is a big concern to him.

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  11. If you were Montag would you have risked everything in your life to steal the books? Or would you you just keep setting the fires?

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    1. I don't know what I would do. I love books, but do I love them so much that I would risk my life? That would be a hard choice, but I think that if I could save society by stealing books, I would do it.

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    2. At some point I would have probably stolen a book. Once Montag questions the system, he sees what is wrong with it. He saw what they really were and he questioned himself and the system. He wanted to know what books were really about and why they were so bad, if they really were. I would have done the same thing Montag did.

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    3. I probably would have stolen a book, too. I think burning people and their houses would sicken me, and I'd like to think that I would take the same path that Montag did.

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    4. I don't think Montag is very happy with his life. So if I was in his situation, I would risk my life to steal and read books. I would have nothing to lose.

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    5. If I had the choice to steal a book and risk everything or to continue setting fires, I would choose to steal a book. I think that if you do not challenge the law then you are agreeing with it. I do not think I could agree to burning books so I would feel an obligation to steal and read the books.

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    6. I don't know what I'd do. I love reading, but would I love reading in that society? If someone doesn't know about something, they won't crave or desire it. I think I might have stolen a book because I'm extremely curious- if curiosity killed the cat then I am a dead man.

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    7. I would have taken the books because that way he is able to see what life was like and how it should be. I think he knows that the way his life is very controlled, and if I lived like that, I'd want to change the way I live, or get away by reading.

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  12. What do you think would happen to Mildred if she didn't have her vast sources of entertainment and TV? How would Mildred react to losing all of that, in your opinion?

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    1. I think the Mildred would go insane. With all of the technology she has now, she still took many pills, she still doesn't remember how her and Guy met. If she is this crazy now, then without all of her necessities she will have the insanity but to a new level.

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    2. I don't think she would have anything to live for. She spends all her day watching the parlor walls. If you take that away she won't have anything to do. I think that would cause her to overdose more frequently

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    3. I think that if Mildred didn't have her vast sources of entertainment she would go even more crazy than she is now. Mildred is very dependent on her "family" to the point that she actually believes that they are her family, so if she lost that it would be like us losing our entire family. Sad, mournful, and depressing.

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    4. I believe that she would lose it for sure. That is her way of life. She greatly depends on this entertainment. It seems as though this is all that she depends on. She might have a mental breakdown and also physically react poorly as well.

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    5. I totally agree with Lauren. Mildred obviously relies on the technology to take her to a different world, and to forget about the present, so without it, she would just lose the little bit of sanity that she has now.

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    6. I think Mildred's mind would have simply shut down. She probably would have gone into a coma or gone insane. Mildred relies on TV so much that it would be like taking away a stereotypical teenager's phone, computer, and all other forms of entertainment/technology.

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    7. The lifestyle that Mildred and the other civilians live is the only kind of life they have ever known. They would be very confused and lost without television; they wouldn't know what to do.

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  13. If fireman's purpose is supposed to keep society happy then why are they viewed as villains (Clarisse mentioned this before.)

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    1. I don't know that they were necessarily seen as villains, but they were the law enforcement for having books, so that depends on interpretation of how people view them.

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    2. I agree with Zach, they are only seen as villains by the people who want to keep reading. Every who is ignorant to reading, such as Mildred, see them as heroes.

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  14. "We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal." - Beatty, Pg 55, original version.
    How do you interpret this quote? What do you think Bradly wanted to point out? What kind of person do you see Beatty as?

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    1. In my mind, Beatty half portrays the author's true feelings in the book--that society is going to shambles, that society is corrupting and so Beatty, by giving history of fireman, sort of shows that the author is uncomfortable with society's place.

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    2. The constitution says everyone is born equal, but Beatty is saying that there is no way things can be kept that way forever. The needs to be a way for everyone to be forced to be equal, and then that way everyone can be happy. Bradbury wanted to point out that not everyone is equal in their knowledge and their abilities. So, the Fahrenheit 451 society keeps people equal and happy by taking away cause to be unequal and taking down those people who are better than everyone else.

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    3. I see this quote, and I think of Harrison Bergeron. Society has to make everyone equal by using handicaps or something else, like not letting them perform to their full potential.

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    4. I think that the government has warped the Constitution. Originally, I interpreted the quote as saying that the Constitution said everyone was made equal. The true words are everyone is "created" equal- which can mean made, whether in life or in the womb. I think Bradley wanted to point out that words can be easily warped to fit interpretation- from the Constitution to Bradley's books. Beatty is just as brainwashed as everyone else- just at a different level. While Mildred is obviously brainwashed, Beatty doesn't seem like he is brainwashed- but the way he acts and talks points out that he is.

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    5. I think Beatty is Bradbury's way of venting and showing the reader what is really wrong in that society.

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  15. How do you think the books Montag found and began to read will affect him? Will he be able to comprehend the books? Or will he collapse back into society?

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    1. I think Montag is a purpose; he is the theme of the book. The author is reaching out to people in society to change their world around them. I feel like Montag will realize the wonderful world of books and will feel motivated to make a difference. He will be the bigger person in society.

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    2. In my opinion, the book has to have a plot, so I believe that he will read them, and maybe not understand them in the beginning, yet slowly but surely take the morals from the books and apply them to his life/ realize that the government is wrong and revolt.

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    3. I think the books that Montag found will be very important to how he acts for the rest of the book. Now that he will have read all these texts, he will know what he's burning, so I don't think that he'll want to burn them any more. I do think that he will be able to comprehend them because when he is talking to Clarisse he seems like he could understnad deeper level thinking.

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    4. I think that the books will greatly affect him. The books will give Montag a new way to look at the world. As Montag's point of view changes, I think he will begin to become greatly suspicious of those in power. Especially in this society, it would be easier for Montag to give up reading and follow the crowd. But as he continues to read he will become enlightened to a society that is different from his own. I think Montag will embrace his doubts and try to change how people think.

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    5. Clarisse has already planted a seed in Montag that has changed his way of thinking, if only slightly. I think if Montag read the books his point of view would continue to change, and he would start being curious and questioning society even more.

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  16. On page 57, Beatty says, "Forget them. Burn all, burn everything.Fire is bright and fire is clean." What does he mean and what is trying to say?

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    1. I think that he is trying to relate the the analogy of washing the blood off your hands. By this, I mean that the firemen seem partially responsible for what happens to the books, but he is obviously trying to derive the attention to the fire, meaning, he is letting the fire stand as the object that "cleans his hands."

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    2. He is basically saying that instead of dealing with problems, differences, and unhappy moments, we can just burn them. Then, all that is left is ashes, and nobody remembers what was the problem. In the Fahrenheit 451 society, people seems to have a short memory and they try to forget sad things. People in the society are like little kids who don't stand up to their government.

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    3. I think he's saying that fire is an easy way to cleanse society of its problems. People don't want to remember things if they don't like it, and they'd rather think about happy things, like in Harrison Bergeron when George told Hazel to forget sad things. Also, burning things will prevent further problems from arising. If they burn the books, no one can read them and get any ideas about overthrowing the government.

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  17. "Happiness is important. Fun is everything. And yet I keep sitting there saying to myself, I'm not happy, I'm not happy," Guy told Mildred, and then she responded,
    "I am. And proud of it."
    -P.62
    What do you think of Mildred's response. Do you think she is really happy or not? Why?

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    1. No one can truly be happy from these kinds of activities. The joy only last a while. She is always watching the TV, and therefore, believes that she is truly happy because she partakes of so much.

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    2. Mildred is not truly happy because she doesn't actually know happiness. She is only as happy as she thinks she is, but that has a limited extent because she doesn't know true happiness.

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    3. I think that Mildred thinks she is happy. She is so simple minded that she can't realize if she is actually happy or not. It took Montag a while to realize that he actually isn't happy. I think that if Mildred realizes if she is truely happy or not, it will take a while.

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    4. She definitely thinks she is happy. But she defines happiness the way that the society tells her it is. She isn't happy the way we see it today. She is told she is happy by government and soceity, and so she believes it.

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    5. Mildred is happy. She is blissful ignorant and doesn't wish to become educated. Mildred has conformed to societies idea of happiness and to her that is enough.

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    6. I think that Mildred's response is very narcissistic. Guy is telling her that he isn't happy at all, and yet she is basically rubbing it in his face that oh I don't really care about you, only about me. I don't think that she really is happy, because if she was than I think that she wouldn't be as dependent on her "family" if she was.

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    7. Mildred is happy, because the life she lives is the only kind she has ever known. She hasn't been exposed to anything different; she has nothing to compare her lifestyle to. Therefore, Mildred thinks she is content, so she is.

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  18. When Beatty is visiting Montag, he talks about, "All the minor minor minorities with their navels to be kept clean." Is he saying that their jobs is to make this statement true, or is he saying that books, magazines, and other types of literature have been censored to this point?

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    1. Beatty seems like he's different from the other firemen as well, because he actually has some knowledge about books. Why do you think this is? And what will his role be in the future?

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  19. With this reading, we just finished Part One. Why do you think Bradbury separated the book into parts? What do you think the other parts will be about? Will Part Two start where we left off, or will there be a time gap?

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    1. The different parts of the book represent the progression of the story throughout the book, so the focus changes in every part.

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    2. I was wondering the same thing. Why is the book not in chapters? I think Bradbury did this to be different, maybe he is the type of person that prefers to have writing separated by time as compared to topics.

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    3. Part one demonstrates the normal society and the point that pushes Montag off the edge. Part two is what Montag does about his knew thoughts about books. It's a turning point, so thus begins a new 'era' so to speak, and so it s separated into a new part, part two.

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    4. I don't think there will be a time gap. He left part 1 off at a cliffhanger, so I don't think he'll just skip the part where Montag is reading, because his reactions would be important for the reader to know.

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    5. I think that he split it into part to signify a sort of change in Montag. I think that it could go either way, it could stay where it left off or it can skip ahead. I feel like it will probably just start where it left off but it's possible that it doesn't.

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    6. Well I don't think that there will be a time gap because I think Bradbury is using the word part, like a chapter.

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  20. If Montag makes a change in society, what do you think he will do? What do you think the theme or purpose of the author is in this book?

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    1. I suppose that he might try to bring back literature, challenge the government, and change the social norm.

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    2. I think the theme of the book is change- lighting a fire and not falling into a social norm in which the majority of the population is brainwashed. Think for ourselves. I think fire is a huge motif in the book- whether it is burning books or lighting a fire in one's mind- I think fire will play a huge role in the book.

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  21. It was siad in this section that Clarisse is better off dead. Do you agree? Why?

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    1. Personally, I disagree, yet to the government, she is a threat to their normal routine. She could go and effect many more people the way she affected Montag, and change their world. To them, she is way better off dead because then she is no longer a problem.

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    2. I completely disagree. Clarisse being dead is very bad for society. She could have a huge impact on society because of her uniqueness. She really would have been a great motivator for social change.

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    3. I don't think that she is better off dead but I think that Montag is more encouraged to change his view of life, personality with her gone. He can feel the pain from losing her and might be able to really make a change with her gone.

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    4. Society thinks that Clarisse is better off dead. I think it is sad that she was a hope for change and now she is dead. Though, it is also a good thing because she no longer has to live in such a horrible people-killing-other-people-just-for-fun society.

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    5. Beatty said that, and Montag went along with it. Montag only went along with it because it was Beatty who said it. She is a symbol for Montag to remember and fight for later on in the book, and she has already changed Montag, so she is not better off dead, but she is just as helpful as a symbol and memory.

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    6. I think that Clarisse is a motive for Montag. As long as Montag doesn't know what happened to Clarisse, he will keep his curiosity. He didn't read any of the books behind the ventilator grill until he met Clarisse.

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    7. I do not think Clarisse is better off dead, but I do think that her death inspired Montag to begin to challenge the social norm. She died as a martyr, so to speak, she died for what she believed in. Her death is more powerful, because it shows that this government would rather murder then allow people to be different.

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    8. I don't think she is better off dead, but as in the Avengers, Montag needed a reason to fight. He needed the personal pain in order to take the books out of the grill and begin to read them and think about them. Clarisse's death is his reason to fight.

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    9. I don't think so, but Montag needs a martyr, and martyrs are one of the most powerful motivators for a cause.

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  22. Why do you think Mildred wasn't very upset at not being to remember when and where she and Montag met?

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    1. The people in this era are not at all concerned with events of the past. They don't even respect their own history. They are much more focused on the present. This institutes the feeling that the past doesn't realy matter.

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    2. I think that she is so focused on her TV so much that she doesn't care.

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    3. I think Mildred is the "average person" character in this book. From society, from technology she is dependent on everything and is shown as "dumb" and insensitive. She has more potential then she shows, however she is unaffected by emotions, it appears

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    4. I was wondering about that as well. It seems like she doesn't care about the past at all, yet Mildred doesn't seem to concerned about the present.

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    5. Mildred doesn't appear to be very concerned with anything, other than her television. On page 40, she says, "It doesn't matter," and Montag agrees, "No, I guess not."

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  23. Why do you think Montag took a book in the first place?
    What happened in his life that would make him not sure of the social norm?

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    1. It is mentioned that Montag talked to an older man in a park a while ago. That's part of it. Discussion with Clarisse is also part of it. Watching the fires was part of it. The old lady killed herself, which is part of it. Everything just built up on itself until Montag couldn't take it anymore. The first book probably wasn't much...after all, Beatty says that every firemen faces this type of thinking...it's the continued actions and circumstances that push Montag forward.

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    2. Because the woman in the fire would have rather died than live without the books. So Montag saw that and he began to be curious.

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  24. Why do you think the author would make Clarisse, who is such a significant character, disappear so quickly? What was Clarisse's part in the book? Do you think she is really dead?

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    1. Yes she is really dead, and her significance was changing Montag's perspective by asking him the question are you happy, and serving as a symbol and memory for Montag to remember and a reason to fight on in his rebellious ways.

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    2. I think Clarisse is a motive for Montag. He didn't read any of the books he had until he met Clarisse. I think that as long as she is gone, Montag will be curious about their society and chalange the system.

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    3. I think that Bradbury wanted her to display the beginning in Montag's transformation, and that that was her purpose, her meaning. I do think that she is dead.

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    4. I think the reason Clarisse was only in the book for a short section because Bradbury wanted to show how quickly people are "taken care of". Clarisse is a breath of fresh air and helps show what people were doing wrong in society. But because she was only there for a short period of time the reader doesn't get used to her being there.

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    5. I think Bradbury made Clarisse disappear so quickly because she just had to make an impression on Montag and change his point of view a little bit. Once he met her his mindset changed and now he is slightly rebellious and now that Clarisse is gone I think those feeling will fester and lead to more rebellion. And yes, I think she is really dead.

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    6. I think the purpose of Clarisse's character was just to implant some different thoughts in Montag. Clarisse herself wasn't so significant; it was her effect on Montag that was so important.

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  25. Bradbury keeps describing mechanical things as alive. With the mechanical hound Montag kept saying that it didn't "like" him. And also with Mildred's seashells Bradbury described them as praying mantises and lastly with the machine used to pump Mildred's stomach as a "black cobra". Do you think the author does this on purpose? If so does he do it to convey a message or because it is just his writing style.

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    1. I feel that it's his writing style. He likes to call machines alive and use terms that vividly describe the machine in only a few words.

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    2. There aren't a lot of animals in the story (real actual animals), so using animals might suggest that this is an animalistic society. Animals aren't smart enough to make a great social change. Animals can survive a certain way without thinking about whether or not it's right or good. Animals don't study history, either.

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  27. Mildred and Guy cannot remember where they met, yet like Victoria said, Mildred doesn't seem distressed over the topic and dismissed it. What do you think this shows about their society?

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    1. This shows that their society does not put importance on things that we do now, and how she dismissed it shows how careless she is.

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    2. I feel like this shows that their society is so far gone from ours that it almost doesn't seem possible we came from the same place. It also shows that love and family is not as strong as an influence as it is now for people.

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    3. I think this shows that the society is so simple minded and preoccupied with their thoughtless activities that they don't preform to their full potential.

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    4. I feel like this shows that society doesn't put any importance on relationships with nature or natural things; your spouse, outdoors-entertainment, anything like that.

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    5. Also, they don't use their brain enough, so it seems like useless and pointless information to them.

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    6. It shows that in their society they don't care. They would rather watch television than pay attention to their family. Also it shows how easily the human mind can be corrupted. Guy claims that he is in a loving relationship but yet he doesn't remember the day he and his spouse met. This shows that without the proper knowledge we will degrade as a society as a whole.

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  28. Do you think Mildred will eventually betray Montag? He put the household in danger by bringing the books in, so do you think she will turn Montag in to the firemen?

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    1. At some point Mildred will betray Montag.

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    2. I don't think so. Like Montag said, "We are in this together." I think that they will resolve the problem together.

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    3. I think that is Mildred is asked to tell the firemen about Montag's whereabouts, Mildred will give up the information easily. Mildred would much rather keep her TV then save Montag.

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    4. Yes, I think she will betray him because in her mind thats the right thing to do. By what shes done it seems that she doesn't care about Guy all too much. I think she cares about society more than Guy if she is willing to betray him

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    5. I don't think she will because Montag is the only one that works. She basically just sits around and watches TV, she doesn't work at all. I feel like if she betrayed him, she would ruin her way of life because she would have to support herself, which she isn't used to doing.

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    6. I doubt it because Mildred is so attached to her TV and her house that it would break her heart to see them go.

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    7. Mildred doesn't want any change at all, with anything. I think she would much rather sink back into her ignorant bliss and watch television.

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  29. What might push Guy Montag to change the world? What person/what event will push him over the edge?

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    1. If he meets another person who is like Clarissse, or another rebellious person it will push him over the edge and he will change the events of his life, but he won't change the world.

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    2. The books he is going to read are definately going to be a motivating factor. Clarisse at this point is in essence merely a motif, an idea, of challenging the system. On top of this, the lady that died with her books could contribute to his motivation.

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    3. More fires. I think he has to return to his work in order to really be pushed over the edge and realize that this society is wrong and the answer is in those books.

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    4. The book however, may change the world because of how it describes society and the government.

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    5. Clarisse was the spark to get Montag thinking about their society, so I think that if someone similar comes along, they will push Montag over the edge.

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    6. I think he will experience another event that, coupled with Clarisse's death and the old lady with he books, will push him off the edge.

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    7. I think that if he has another episode like the one where the old lady committed suicide by burning herself with her books he will lose his mind and attempt to change the world.

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    8. I think eventually, he'll have done so much, and something big will happen, and then there's no turning back for him. I think that all those people that Montag has met, like the old man he mentioned and Clarisse, and maybe even Beatty all have a part in pushing him towards change.

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    9. I think Clarisse will mostly push him over the edge. She was a rebel and I think that will inspire him. Also I think Mildred will have an affect because Guy doesn't like how society is and noticing how Mildred acts he will want to change it so future generations are different

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    10. I think that a lot of little things have piled up to make Montag start thinking the way he is. Anything, even something little, could finally break Montag.

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  30. Clarisse is to Montag as Piggy was to Ralph. Both died- and in the Lord of the Flies, the power shifts from Ralph to the bad guy, Jack. Do you think this book will follow a similar story line- where Montag begins to change society, and he is overthrown, barely able to survive?

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    1. Yes is seems form the story line so far, that Montag will be overthrown by Beatty and the mechanical hound and he will barely escape with his life.

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    2. I think the book will have similar aspects but will not be similar. Throughout the book I am wondering how the end will show why this book was truly banned. What could possibly happen that would so enrage people that this piece of literature is considered "unreadable."

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    3. The fact of the matter is that Montag does not have a lot of power right now. He can't lose power that he doesn't have. That makes him different from Ralph.

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    4. I would imagine that this book has more of a message of how society can change, and overthrow their own government.

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    5. I think that it will somewhat follow a similar sotry line. Montag doesn't have real power in the society, so his power can't be taken away and given to someone else.

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    6. People were enraged over something bad being published about them, so the censor anything that could be considered offensive to them, so they censor literature to be equal to everyone else who is also censoring literature.

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    7. Great analogy but Montag isn't powerful enough to be overthrown nor will he be without the support of some of society which he doesn't have.

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    8. They were both reflection devices; Ralph could see how savage the boys were becoming by comparing them to the forever civilized Piggy. Montag even described Clarisse as a mirror and she made him reflect back on himself and ask himself if he's happy, which started everything.

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  31. Reading the books themselves will enlighten Montag and inspire him to initiate social change.

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    1. Sorry ya'll I meant to respond not start another post.

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  33. Why would Beatty still follow the rules of society if he has read all the books and actually has some knowledge.

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    1. He has just started reading the books, and all of these events have just started. It takes time for somethings to happen, not just overnight. I think that overtime though, it will all sink in.

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    2. Maybe his way of changing society is doing it from the inside. We don't know enough about Beatty to know if he is trying to change society. He could secretly be encouraging Montag to read by telling him not to. Reverse cycology.Beatty is working on the inside, like a spy. Sort of.

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    3. Beatty still follows the rules of society because he can take advantage of everyone else who follows the rules.

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    4. I think that Beatty is waiting for someone else with the same views that he has, like Montag, to help him

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    5. I think that Beatty still follows the rules of society after reading the books because of what he said to Montag. He said that there was nothing in the books that is important.

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    6. What Sarah said makes perfect sense. Beatty could change more if he was inside the government. But why would he continue to burn books if he wanted to change this society?

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  34. How can this section of literature be a motivator for social change?

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    1. The idea of challenging the system is very prevelant

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  35. What symbols/themes do you see so far?? What do they do to effect the story?

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    1. Change. I feel like the theme is trying to motivate social change by truly changing society: Be the bigger person in society and if you see laziness, dependence on technology, then YOU change it. No one else will.

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    2. Fire. Fire is bright and clean and horrid and cruel- and kind of like the kids on the island in Lord of the Flies, represents the good and bad of society. We could never survive without fire- but we can't exactly control it either. Fire will definitely change the story because in this story we will learn whether this society can control fire or not.

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  36. What style do you notice the author using? How does this effect your reading?

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    1. The author only lets us know as mush as Montag knows. We learn more about the society at the same rate that Montag does. In this way we can really see why Montag does what he does and where he's coming from. We can connect with the main character.

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    2. There are no chapters, but just parts. The titles are very intruiging.

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    3. When describing Montag's feelings, he becomes very imaginative,elaborate, and romantic. However, when speaking for Mildred everything is very choppy and harsh. I think he does a good job of giving an insight into the character's intelligence and development.

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    4. He uses repetition like when he uses drops to describe the events that have affected Montag and he emphasizes and demonstrates all the thoughts that are tumbling around in his head.

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  37. What does the Salamander have to do with the story? Why is it symbolic?

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    1. Salamander is this lizard that can live in fire. So the firemen are represented by the salamander, they live in fire. They thrive in it.

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    2. The Salamander is one of the symbols of the fireman. Salamanders can regenerate parts when they're hurt, and they can survive in harsh conditions, like, fire. So, it's kind of a symbol about how the fireman are almost unaffected by the fires that they set, and most of them are unfazed about situations like suicide that happen as they're trying to rid the world of books.

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  38. When Beatty says, " the mind drinks less and less" on page 54, is he referring to how literature and information are just a bunch of useless information, or how no one learns anything anymore?

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    1. I'd say both. People have less desire to learn, so the information in books is dumbed down. People don't learn since there is nothing useful in the books that survived (picture books and such) and there is nothing useful in the books that survived since people don't want to learn.

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  39. What is the significance of the title- Fahrenheit 451?

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